Journal

Year

“Years following years steal something ev’ry day.
At last they steal us from ourselves away.”

Alexander Pope


One year ago I left. 365 days. It’s hard to believe how fast time flies. A lot has changed in those 365 days. I tried to capture some of these changes, even though I stopped half way through. In any case, I hope you enjoy the result:


“The flow of time is always cruel… its speed seems different for each person, but no one can change it… A thing that does not change with time is a memory of younger days…”

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Sheik


I never thought that I would write another post on this blog. And yet here I am. I never thought things would turn out this way in the past year. And yet they did.

I was there, and now I’m here. I wonder what it will bring, the following year.

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Innenleben, Journal, Photography

Ending

ending
/ˈɛndɪŋ/
noun
  1. an end or final part of something.

“Everything that has a beginning has an end.”

The Oracle, The Matrix Revolutions


140 days ago, my journey began. It ends today.

I’ve read somewhere that you should spend your money on experiences, since a few months/years down the road you will only remember the good parts. I wholeheartedly agree. I remember the last two times I’ve been in south-east Asia I swore myself to never return. I got very sick both times; the second time I got salmonella and was very, very ill. The fun stops when you have 40+ degrees C and only wake up from your delirium because you have to vomit while simultaneously having explosive diarrhoea. I did not remember any of this when I decided to spend the winter in south-east Asia to go climbing.

In any case, I returned to south-east Asia again – and all in all I had a good time! No serious illness, no serious injury, no serious troubles. On paper it was the recipe to have the time of my life; in reality I often wondered what I’m doing here.


“In philosophy and ethics, an end is the ultimate goal in a series of steps. For example, according to Aristotle the end of everything we do is happiness.”

Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia


Happiness. The end of everything we do. I thought that I would be happy traveling the world. Going places. Meeting people. “Living the dream.”

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve seen amazing places and met even more amazing people. I’m very grateful for that. Yet, happiness eluded me, most of the time. Even as I am typing this I’m having difficulty with this confession: I haven’t been happy most of the time.

Why that is I can’t really tell. Maybe I’m not good at living in the moment. Maybe I’m not made for traveling solo. Maybe I miss my girl. Maybe I miss my friends. Maybe I miss home. Maybe it’s a little bit of all of those.

It’s not that I was overly depressed or sad – I was neutral, so to speak. The thing is I’d like to think of myself as a very happy person in general. Overly optimistic at times, but generally genuinely happy. At least I used to be. I can’t tell you what happened. I blame time zones, bad internet connections and not being able to interact with the people I love in real time (and in person).


“I shall take the heart… for brains do not make one happy, and happiness is the best thing in the world.”

L. Frank Baum (The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, 1900)


As soon as I decided to end my journey and go back home, a lot has changed. The uncertainty vanished. The anxiety of wandering around aimlessly disappeared. I was no longer feeling like I’m wasting my time. I realise that this sounds stupid – after all the time is not wasted – but that’s how I felt, even if it was just a part of me.

We are living in a strange world. A world where it is very easy to share your thoughts with friends and family, or with strangers on the Internet. It’s a strange thing, sharing your inner thoughts with the world. I’m not sure why I do did.

On the one hand I believe in privacy. I am not an advocate of reckless and relentless over-sharing. Unfortunately we are living in a society that will punish you for your secrets. If history has anything to teach us, it is that things can get very ugly very quickly. Suddenly you find yourself in jail – or worse – because you have read a certain book, hold a certain belief or have certain sexual preferences.

On the other hand I believe in openness. I believe in transparency. I believe in sharing. I believe that the world would be a better place if everyone realised that people are more alike than they are different. Fighting the same fight, day in day out.


140 days

140 days.


I want to end this post by thanking every single one of you. This blog was part experiment, part travel journal. For me it was mostly an outlet. For you, I hope it was at least somewhat entertaining. Thank you for taking the time to look at my pictures. Thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts.

The amount of positive feedback I got was overwhelming. Many people wrote directly to me, wishing me luck, complimenting me, sharing words of encouragement. Some of you who wrote me I haven’t heard from in months or even years. Others were complete strangers. Others are close friends. Some I’ve met on the way, and I hope that our paths will cross again in the future. I want to thank you all. I probably would not have made it through the hard times if it weren’t for you.

It is easy to feel insignificant in this overly connected world. Every day we are drowning in our Facebook and Twitter feeds. We share pictures of everything and anything on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. We have access to all the worlds knowledge as well as all the worlds nonsense at any time of the day. Due to all this noise it is easy to think that nobody is interested in you, what you do, what you have to say. I thought almost nobody would show any interest (except for my mum of course – hi mum!). The fact that I threw this blog together in 20 minutes in Mike’s living room during one of the most stressful days of my life did not help. (Thanks again for letting me crash there.) I thought no one would care about an unpolished stream of rambling thoughts and amateurish pictures.

Yet, 140 days and 30 posts later, almost 6000 visitors accumulated over 14000 views. I’m still blown away by this.


“What one needs to do at every moment of one’s life is to put an end to the old world and to begin a new world.”

Nikolai Berdyaev, The Beginning and the End (1947).


This is what I’ll do. Begin a new world. What shape and form this world will take I do not know – the vision of it will probably change a little bit every day. I know I can’t do it all by myself. But I want to help where I can. I want to help to create a better world for myself, the people I care about, future generations, society as a whole. That might sound ambitious, or outright crazy. I like to think that it is possible, and I’ll be damned if I’m not going to try.


“Many of the world’s great movements, of thought and action, have flowed from the work of a single man. A young monk began the Protestant Reformation, a young general extended an empire from Macedonia to the borders of the earth, and a young woman reclaimed the territory of France. It was a young Italian explorer who discovered the New World, and 32-year-old Thomas Jefferson who proclaimed that all men are created equal. “Give me a place to stand,” said Archimedes, “and I will move the world.” These men moved the world, and so can we all.”

Robert F. Kennedy


Thank you, again, for everything. Thank you for sticking around from the beginning to the end. Who knows what kind of adventure is about to begin. After all, new things can only begin when old ones are ending.

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Journal, Photography

Laos

“Use a picture. It’s worth a thousand words.”

Arthur Brisbane, 1911


Orchids.

Orchids. This one’s for you, mum! (I hope these are orchids)

Monks are free to use this bridge. Ordinary plebs like me have to pay to walk.

Monks are free to use this bridge. Ordinary plebs like me have to pay to walk.

One of the countless temples in Laos.

If someone wants to publish a book about temples hit me up. I’ve got a gazillion pictures like this.

Motorbikes. Motorbikes everywhere!

In case of sun glare close your eyes.

Laos style BBQ at the street corner (serving, among other things, dog).

Laos style BBQ at the street corner. Dogs are tasty!

Aww darn, and I wanted to feed those bears!

Aww darn, and I wanted to feed those bears!

She is feeding them! Arrest her!

She is feeding them! Arrest her!

10... 9... 8... 7... 6... 5... 4... 3... 2... 1... *click*

It took 53 tries to get this picture. Ah just kidding – first try, bitches! Yeah I’m that good.

Dreamy waterfalls.

Waterfalls, y u so dreamy?

Just look at that majestic cock!

Just look at that huge cock! It even got its own trophy because it is so majestically huge!

Cycling is so much easier if you don't have 30kg of stuff with you!

Cycling is so much easier if you don’t have 30kg of stuff with you.

Standing on top.

Washing my dirty feet.

Look ma! No hands!

Look, ma! No hands!

Sharing the road.

I can’t even remember why I took this picture.

Some more flowers. Everyone likes flowers.

Some more flowers. Everyone likes flowers.

Misty mountains.

Misty mountains. Embellished by electron shooting cables.

Landslides. Turning a 5h bus ride into a 8h bus ride.

Landslides. Turning a 5h bus ride into a 10h bus ride.

Damn it, I thought I was the only one who had the ingenious idea to go by bicycle.

Damn it, I thought I was the only one who had the ingenious idea to go by bicycle.

Ok. This picture doesn't do this fucking huge spider justice. I just couldn't bring myself to move to coin any closer. Yeah, laugh at me. And when you're done laughing try holding a coin close to a spider that is bigger than your freaking face!

Ok. This picture doesn’t do this fucking huge spider justice. I just couldn’t bring myself to move the coin any closer. Yeah, laugh at me. And when you’re done laughing try holding a coin close to a spider that is bigger than your freaking face!

Sunset in Vang Vieng.

Twenty Chinese people took the exact same picture as I did. So I made mine yellow. Now that I think of it, that sounds kinda racist. Sorry.

Most of the time people will not even get off their bikes to get food. Let alone get rid of their helmet (if they wear one).

I want to see someone eat one of those fishes wearing a full-face helmet.

I liked this arch.

I liked this arch.

Nice to meet you too, King Anouvong.

Pleased to meet you too, King Anouvong.

Why don't you ever see elephants hiding in trees? Because they're really good at it.

Why don’t you ever see elephants hiding in trees? Because they’re really good at it.

Alright, enough pictures for now – even though I’m in a good mood and could go on for quite a while. I figured after some more-or-less hefty philosophical posts a light-hearted one would do no harm. And just to fuck with you I’ll add a quote at the end that can get you from chuckling wholeheartedly to a small existential crisis in no time.


“I think that the tendency for most people is to fall back on a comic interpretation of things — because things are so sad, so terrible. If you didn’t laugh you’d kill yourself. But the truth of the matter is that existence in general is very very tragic, very very sad, very brutal and very unhappy.”

Woody Allen

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Nonsense

“Nonsense is senseless or meaningless talk, language, or ideas; an untrue statement; or behaviour that is foolish or not straightforward.”

Wikiquote contributors


Two weeks have passed since my last post. It has been an eventful two weeks, so I am having a hard time to fit everything in a neat blog post. Thus, in advance, excuse me if this post seems nonsensical to you. (Then again, it might not be the first post that you find nonsensical around here.) Let me break it up in chapters, so the nonsense that follows it at least easier to consume.


Chapter 1: Behaviour that is foolish or not straightforward

My behaviour was not straightforward indeed. If it was foolish I don’t know. I let others be the judge of that. It turns out that my last post was more truthful than I had imagined. I was indeed running in circles, visiting Tonsai again as well as Koh Phi Phi.

It was strange returning to a place that was practically my home for more than a month. Many things have changed, although some familiar faces were still there. Heraclitus said it perfectly two and a half thousand years ago: “Everything changes and nothing stands still.” I wonder how this place will look like in a few months. I wonder if it is even recognisable anymore. I wonder if it was a good idea to go back.


“If it’s a good idea, go ahead and do it. It is much easier to apologize than it is to get permission.”

Admiral Grace Hopper


I don’t regret going back. After all I was able to spend a few precious days with some wonderful people, in one of the most beautiful places on earth.

Tonsai Bay Resort.

Tonsai Bay Resort.

Alien landscape created by the crabs of Railay.

Alien landscape created by the crabs of Railay.

The last sunset at Tonsai Beach.

The last sunset at Tonsai Beach.

One last dinner at Sao's Legacy.

One last dinner at Sao’s Legacy.

Back in Koh Phi Phi.

Back in Koh Phi Phi.

Artists in Koh Phi Phi. (That reminds me that I was lucky enough to meet an artist in Koh Phi Phi the first time I've been there.)

Artists in Koh Phi Phi. (That reminds me that I was lucky enough to meet an artist in Koh Phi Phi the first time I’ve been there.)

The last temple I've visited in Thailand (White Temple, Chiang Rai).

The last temple I’ve visited in Thailand (White Temple, Chiang Rai).


Chapter 2: Senseless ideas

“If you want to have good ideas you must have many ideas. Most of them will be wrong, and what you have to learn is which ones to throw away.”

Linus Pauling


Green lights illuminate the Gulf of Thailand every night. As soon as the sun sets below the horizon a myriad of fishing boats switches on their light bulbs and black turns into green. Some years ago I’ve learned that these green lights are used to attract squid. Turn on the lights and the squid will come. Oh how ingenious we humans are! Catching them by the tons is suddenly an easy task.

Green lights illuminate the horizon.

Green lights illuminate the horizon.


“Anglers have a way of romanticizing their battles with fish and of forgetting that the fish has a hook in his mouth, his gullet, or his belly and that his gameness is really an extreme of panic in which he runs, leaps, and pulls to get away until he dies. It would seem to be enough advantage to the angler that the fish has the hook in his mouth rather than the angler.”

Ernest Hemingway


It wasn’t until I took a plane from Krabi to Chiang Mai that the scale of these squid fishing operations became clear to me. I knew that overfishing is a problem we face worldwide, but seeing the squid fishing fleets with my own eyes was something else. A sea of green lights as far as the eye can see – to the horizon and beyond. It is almost impossible to imagine, since when you are on shore you only see a handful boats, a dozen at most. Several thousand feet above sea level it looks very different.

Hundreds of green dots (you might have to view this one fullscreen and turn up your brightness, since it was almost impossible to capture the faint lights with my camera).

Hundreds of green dots (you might have to view this one fullscreen and turn up your brightness, since it was almost impossible to capture the faint lights with my camera).

Bangkok for scale.

Bangkok for scale.


Seeing these fleets made me think – about fishing, about the oceans, about consumerism, about the way we currently do things and why we do those things in the way we do them. Don’t get me wrong, I think about those things quite often. This time, however, I was not only lamenting the current state of affairs. I amused myself with ideas of how we could do things differently. I’m certainly not the first person to have ideas like these; those ideas are not my ideas to begin with. I have picked up bits and pieces reading stuff or listening to podcasts and whatnot here and there.


“A good idea is something that does not solve just one single problem, but rather can solve multiple problems at once.”

Shigeru Miyamoto


So what are those ideas? I can only try to type out some of them that stormed through my brain that flight: reducing the consumption of meat and fish; diversifying our diet (e.g. eating insects, some of which are extremely efficient in terms of converting grass to meat – especially in comparison to cows); switching to in vitro meat; re-evaluating the status quo of which animals are ok to eat and which are not (why do we eat cows, pigs and chickens, and not hamsters, cats and dogs?); and so on and so forth. I now recognise that most of these ideas require a change in human society, possibly in human nature. The pessimist in me whispers that these ideas might be meaningless after all. Note, however, that I tend to be optimistic most of the time.


“It’s important not to overstate the benefits of ideas. Quite frankly, I know it’s kind of a romantic notion that you’re just going to have this one brilliant idea and then everything is going to be great. But the fact is that coming up with an idea is the least important part of creating something great. It has to be the right idea and have good taste, but the execution and delivery are what’s key.”

Sergey Brin


After a while I drifted off to related topics, such as: How long will we still have until antibiotic resistance becomes a reality due to our excessive use of antibiotics in farming? Luckily the flight was a short one so I was able to avoid the small existential crisis that usually follows such thoughts.


Chapter 3: Meaningless talk

Be assured that I mean ‘meaningless’ in the best possible way. Merry, innocent, meaningless talk after having the most amazing dinner with friends. Friends I’ve met in Tonsai over the last weeks. Friends I’ve met again in Chiang Mai.

I have shot many pictures of this small reunion. I will not re-upload them here. There are just too many pictures. You can view the album on Facebook, if you like. The following pictures are my favourites, which I decided to upload here as well.

Smoking.

Smoking.

Driving off into the night.

Driving off into the night.


Chapter 4: Senseless language

Yesterday I left Thailand after being there for two months. My first impression of Laos is a good one, although I find myself once more in a country where the language doesn’t make any sense to me. Not that Thai made a lot of sense to me, but at least I could communicate in a most primitive way – something I yet have to learn in Lao.


Language is the expression of ideas, and if the people of one country cannot preserve an identity of ideas they cannot retain an identity of language.

Noah Webster


I decided to take the slow boat into Laos, which turned out to be a good decision. The boat ride was very scenic and not as uncomfortable as accounts of previous travellers made me to believe it would be. I welcomed the many hours on the boat. Reading, listening to music and podcasts, followed by more reading. I am currently finishing The Mind’s I, which I can highly recommend to anyone who is interested in philosophy, computer science, identity, consciousness, artificial intelligence… anyone.

Let me conclude this nonsensical post by sharing my first impressions of Laos with you. Enjoy!


Slow boats on the Mekong river.

Slow boats on the Mekong river.

Mekong river sundown.

Mekong river sundown.

Unloading the boats.

Unloading the boats.

Mekong.

Mekong.

Breakfast with the locals.

Breakfast with the locals.

Waste management.

Waste management.

Parking.

Parking.

Transportation, Laos style.

Transportation, Laos style.

Night market, Luang Prabang.

Night market, Luang Prabang.

Addendum: Since it is so fitting, I’ll let Wittgenstein have the last word here.


“My aim is: to teach you to pass from a piece of disguised nonsense to something that is patent nonsense.”

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Circles

“A circle is a plane figure bounded by one line, and such that all right lines drawn from a certain point within it to the bounding line, are equal. The bounding line is called its circumference and the point, its centre.”

Euclid. Elements Book I.


Circles are very peculiar things. The most perfect of all shapes – according to the Pythagoreans – yet, as far as we know, not a single circle exists in this universe. There are plenty of approximations of a circle – but not a single perfect circle; not in this world, nor in others.

You might say that this is obviously true since we live in a universe with three spatial dimensions. However, the same applies to spheres.


Take a picture of a sphere and it becomes a circle.

Take a picture of a sphere and it becomes a circle.


“Mathematics would certainly have not come into existence if one had known from the beginning that there was in nature no exactly straight line, no actual circle, no absolute magnitude.”

Friedrich Nietzsche


Yet, the universe we live in seems to be ruled by mathematics. At least, to the best of our judgement, it obeys laws that can be expressed mathematically. This fact about nature is absolutely fascinating and always kindles my imagination. Could it be otherwise? How would a universe look like if it was governed by laws that are not expressible? How would any system without any laws look like? Can such a system exist?


In Zen Buddhism, an ensō (円相 , "circle") is a circle that is hand-drawn in one or two uninhibited brushstrokes to express a moment when the mind is free to let the body create.

In Zen Buddhism, an ensō (円相 , “circle”) is a circle that is hand-drawn in one or two uninhibited brushstrokes to express a moment when the mind is free to let the body create.


For some reason virtually nobody bothers to ask these questions; neither in school nor in higher education. Most people find mathematics boring, hard, complicated. It is not only socially acceptable to hate math, it’s kinda cool. Since everyone hates it, and – I suspect – most people don’t understand it, we teach what I like to call “cookbook math”. You learn a few recipes (by heart), learn what recipe to use for each problem, and try to keep them all in your head for this one exam. Cookbook math. If you have all the ingredients and know the recipe by heart you can produce something that is edible. But what to do if something is a little bit different or an ingredient is missing! Oh if only someone taught you how to cook!

Unfortunately the analogy is not perfect. In cooking, most people don’t follow a recipe perfectly. It’s more of a rough guideline. You might use another ingredient since the original one was too hard to get. You taste, smell, experiment. You actually learn how to cook if you do it often enough. Granted, the same might be true for following mathematical recipes; but I have the feeling that it is different for abstract things. Most people can not smell, taste or feel numbers and thus take the path of least resistance: learn everything by heart without actually understanding any of it. How do I know? I was one of those people as well.

A better analogy would be cooking while sensorily deprived (blind, smell- and tasteless), following instructions you don’t really understand, and forgetting everything after you hand in your plate/exam.


Did you know that circular breathing while smoking is a thing?

Did you know that circular breathing while smoking is a thing?


It’s been a while since I last took an exam of any sort. A few days ago I had to, and in preparation our group was asked a bunch of example questions. Some of the questions were followed up by the favourite question of every child, which also happens to be one of my favourite questions: “Why?”

I love why questions. Why, you might ask? Because you will soon reach a point where the only answer is “nobody knows”. Why? Because you can keep asking why, ad infinitum. Why? Because no matter the answer, there is always a layer below. Why? It just seems that it is that way. Why? Nobody knows. Why? I love why questions.

Sadly we always stopped after the first layer. Why do you have to breathe out when you are going back up? Because the air in your lungs expands when you go up. Full stop. Satisfied after the first layer. What a shame! Of course it would be pure madness to play the “Why?” game all day every day. You wouldn’t get anything done! But just for the fun of it I kept playing it silently in my head, laughing at myself and the conclusions I arrived at. Most of the time I ended up at “Because there are three spatial dimensions in our universe.” (Even though there might be more.) Wanna go down this rabbit hole with me? No? Ok.


Why is coffee black?

Why is coffee black?


Whenever I find myself musing about things like this I think of Richard Feynman. I wasn’t even three years old when he died, yet he is one of the most influential persons in my life. He explained the problem with why questions beautifully in a 1983 BBC interview:


“[T]he problem, you see, when you ask why something happens, how does a person answer why something happens? For example, Aunt Minnie is in the hospital. Why? Because she went out, slipped on the ice, and broke her hip. That satisfies people. It satisfies, but it wouldn’t satisfy someone who came from another planet and who knew nothing about why when you break your hip do you go to the hospital. How do you get to the hospital when the hip is broken? Well, because her husband, seeing that her hip was broken, called the hospital up and sent somebody to get her. All that is understood by people. And when you explain a why, you have to be in some framework that you allow something to be true. Otherwise, you’re perpetually asking why. Why did the husband call up the hospital? Because the husband is interested in his wife’s welfare. Not always, some husbands aren’t interested in their wives’ welfare when they’re drunk, and they’re angry.

And you begin to get a very interesting understanding of the world and all its complications. If you try to follow anything up, you go deeper and deeper in various directions. For example, if you go, “Why did she slip on the ice?” Well, ice is slippery. Everybody knows that, no problem. But you ask why is ice slippery? That’s kinda curious. Ice is extremely slippery. It’s very interesting. You say, how does it work? You could either say, “I’m satisfied that you’ve answered me. Ice is slippery; that explains it,” or you could go on and say, “Why is ice slippery?” and then you’re involved with something, because there aren’t many things as slippery as ice. It’s very hard to get greasy stuff, but that’s sort of wet and slimy. But a solid that’s so slippery? Because it is, in the case of ice, when you stand on it (they say) momentarily the pressure melts the ice a little bit so you get a sort of instantaneous water surface on which you’re slipping. Why on ice and not on other things? Because water expands when it freezes, so the pressure tries to undo the expansion and melts it. It’s capable of melting, but other substances get cracked when they’re freezing, and when you push them they’re satisfied to be solid.

Not as cold as ice, but it does go round and round.

Not as cold as ice, but it does go round and round.

Why does water expand when it freezes and other substances don’t? I’m not answering your question, but I’m telling you how difficult the why question is. You have to know what it is that you’re permitted to understand and allow to be understood and known, and what it is you’re not. You’ll notice, in this example, that the more I ask why, the deeper a thing is, the more interesting it gets. We could even go further and say, “Why did she fall down when she slipped?” It has to do with gravity, involves all the planets and everything else. Nevermind! It goes on and on […]”

Richard Feynman


It goes on and on indeed. So let me stop here before I do the same. Why this post? Why circles? Let me summon George Bernard Shaw to answer this question:


“I hear you say “Why?” Always “Why?” You see things; and you say “Why?” But I dream things that never were; and I say “Why not?””

George Bernard Shaw


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Innenleben

Head

“What a wee little part of a person’s life are his acts and his words! His real life is lead in his head, and is known to none but himself. All day long, and every day, the mill of his brain is grinding, and his thoughts, (which are but the mute articulation of his feelings,) not those other things are his history. His acts and his words are merely the visible thin crust of his world, with its scattered snow summits and its vacant wastes of water-and they are so trifling a part of his bulk! a mere skin enveloping it. The mass of him is hidden-it and its volcanic fires that toss and boil, and never rest, night nor day. These are his life, and they are not written, and cannot be written.”

Mark Twain

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Photography

Time

“Time is the most precious gift in our possession, for it is the most irrevocable. This is what makes it so disturbing to look back upon the time which we have lost. Time lost is time when we have not lived a full human life, time unenriched by experience, creative endeavor, enjoyment, and suffering. Time lost is time not filled, time left empty.”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer


Sarah, bouldering high above.

Sarah, bouldering high above.


“To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.”

Susan Sontag


Danilo giving blessings.

Danilo giving blessings.

Preparations for the water festival.

Preparations for the water festival.

Another beautiful sunset at Tonsai Bay.

Another beautiful sunset at Tonsai Bay.


“You put your camera around your neck in the morning, along with putting on your shoes, and there it is, an appendage of the body that shares your life with you. The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.”

Dorothea Lange


Fon, always smiling, always handing out delicious coffee.

Fon, always smiling, always handing out delicious coffee.

Ai, probably the strongest massage lady in Tonsai.

Ai, probably the strongest massage lady in Tonsai.

Living, working, sleeping and drinking in his shop.

Living, working, sleeping and drinking in his shop.

Sao, cooking with a smile.

Sao, cooking with a smile.


“Of time you would make a stream upon whose bank you would sit and watch its flowing. Yet the timeless in you is aware of life’s timelessness, And knows that ‘yesterday is but today’s memory and tomorrow is today’s dream.”

Khalil Gibran


Enjoying the view over Koh Phi Phi.

Enjoying the view over Koh Phi Phi.


“The past is past, the future unformed. There is only the moment, and that is where he prefers to be.”

William Gibson


Before the lights went out.

Before the lights went out.


“Ever eating, never cloying, All-devouring, all-destroying, Never finding full repast, Till I eat the world at last.”

Jonathan Swift, On Time.

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